The Great Glen

The Great Glen

The Great Glen (An Gleann Mòr) runs 104km (65 miles) across the Scottish Highlands from Fort William, at the head of Loch Linnhe, in the west to Inverness, on the Moray Firth, in the east.

The road along the Great Glen skirts the banks of Loch Lochy, Loch Oich and Loch Ness, and is recognised as one of the most scenic drives in Britain.

The Glen provides a natural travelling route across the Highlands of Scotland, and is the course of both the Caledonian Canal and the main A82 highway, which we will follow on our tour. 

The glen follows the line of an enormously long geological fault known as the Great Glen Fault, which bisects the Highlands and can be traced at least as far as Ireland in one direction and Shetland in the other. The fault has a very complex history and movement along the fault probably took place in different directions at different times. The rocks forming the North-West Highlands are thought to have moved at least 100km relative to those forming the Grampian Mountains  on the southeast  side of the fault. The fault is likely to have been similar in character to the present day San Andreas fault in California.