Glen Coe

Glen Coe

As soon as you enter the steep sided valley that is Glen Coe you cannot be anything but impressed. No matter the weather, and some say the glen is at its most moody in the rain, Glen Coe never fails to amaze!

Glen Coe is famous as the setting for the infamous massacre of 1692, during which thirty-eight members of the resident MacDonald clan were slaughtered by Campbell troops working under Government orders.

There is, however, far more to Glen Coe than the massacre. The mysterious, forbidding landscape never fails to affect the visitor. On visiting the glen in 1841, Charles Dickens said “it resembled a burial ground of a race of giants”. The glen stretches from Glencoe village and Loch Leven to Rannoch Moor. The mountains in the glen offer excellent opportunities for hill-walking and snow, ice and rock-climbing, whatever the season.

Standing at the eastern end of Glen Coe, Buachaille Etive Mor is a magnet for climbers. Its name means ‘Big Herdsman of Etive’ and its main summit, Stob Dearg, rises to 3,353 feet. Approached from the A82 across Rannoch Moor, the mountain is particularly impressive, rising straight up from the flat moorland like a sentry over the entrance to Glen Coe. Any ascent from this side will involve some rock-climbing, though the least demanding route is via Treadmill Scree from behind the former Royal Forester’s house at Lagangarbh.